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Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy for Brown Refund Specialist

Effective Date: 10/10/2023

  1. Introduction

Brown Refund Specialist ("we," "our," or "us") is a consultancy agency dedicated to assisting individuals and businesses in recovering unclaimed government funds and refunds. We are committed to protecting the privacy and security of your personal information. This Privacy Policy outlines how we collect, use, disclose, and safeguard your personal information when you interact with our services and website.

By using our services or accessing our website, you agree to the practices described in this Privacy Policy. If you do not agree with the terms of this Privacy Policy, please do not use our services.

  1. Information We Collect

We may collect various types of personal information directly from you when you interact with our services and website:

2.1. Information You Provide:

  • Contact information (such as name, address, email address, and phone number)

  • Financial information (including bank account details for refund processing)

  • Government-related information (such as tax identification numbers)

  • Other information you choose to provide during our consultancy services

  1. How We Use Your Information

We use the information we collect for the following purposes:

3.1. Providing Consultancy Services:

  • Assist in identifying and claiming unclaimed money and refunds

  • Communicate with you regarding your refund claims

  • Provide customer support and address inquiries

3.2. Legal and Regulatory Compliance:

  • Fulfil our legal and regulatory obligations, including cooperating with government authorities and tax agencies

3.3. Improving Our Services:

  • Analyze website usage and trends to enhance your experience

  • Customise and personalise the services we offer

3.4. Marketing and Communications:

  • Send promotional and informational emails (you can opt out at any time)

  1. How We Share Your Information

We do not share your personal information with third parties for any purposes, including data collection or marketing.

  1. Your Choices and Rights

You have specific rights concerning your personal information:

5.1. Access and Correction:

  • You can request access to and correction of your personal information.

5.2. Opt-Out:

  • You can opt out of receiving promotional emails from us.

5.3. Data Deletion:

  • You can request the deletion of your personal information, subject to legal requirements.

  1. Security

We employ reasonable measures to protect your personal information from unauthorised access, disclosure, or alteration. However, it's important to note that no method of data transmission over the internet is entirely secure, and we cannot guarantee absolute security.

  1. Children's Privacy

Our services are not intended for children under the age of 13, and we do not knowingly collect or maintain information from children.

  1. Changes to this Privacy Policy

We may update this Privacy Policy periodically to reflect changes in our practices, operational needs, or legal requirements. The revised Privacy Policy will be posted on our website along with the effective date.

  1. Contact Us

If you have any questions or concerns regarding this Privacy Policy or your personal information, please reach out to us at 1800 113 900.

ACT

Unclaimed Money Act 1969 (ACT) In the Australian Capital Territory (ACT), the Unclaimed Money Act 1969 sets the framework for the management of unclaimed money. Entities holding unclaimed money are required to report and remit it to the ACT government. The Act establishes reporting criteria and deadlines. Notification is a critical aspect, and entities must make reasonable efforts to notify owners before reporting unclaimed money to the government. The notification process often involves written communication to ensure that owners have an opportunity to claim their funds. The legislation defines the period of dormancy, typically around 7 years, after which money is considered unclaimed. Individuals can search for and claim their unclaimed money through the ACT government. The legislation includes provisions to protect the rights of owners, allowing them to reclaim the funds at any time. Non-compliance with reporting and remittance requirements may result in penalties, and the ACT government may conduct audits and enforce compliance. The Unclaimed Money Act in the Australian Capital Territory can change over time, so it's essential for businesses and entities to stay informed about the specific requirements outlined in the Act.

2

NSW

Unclaimed Money Act 1995 (NSW) The Unclaimed Money Act 1995 (NSW) governs the management and recovery of unclaimed money in New South Wales. Unclaimed money is defined as any money held by businesses, government agencies, or financial institutions that has been dormant or unclaimed by its rightful owner. The Act lays down specific guidelines for reporting and remitting unclaimed money to the NSW Office of State Revenue. Entities holding unclaimed money are obligated to report it to the Office, following established reporting deadlines. Before escheatment (the transfer of unclaimed money to the state), businesses and financial institutions are required to make reasonable efforts to notify owners. This notification often occurs via mail or email to ensure that owners have an opportunity to claim their funds. The Act defines the period of dormancy, typically around 7 years, after which money is considered unclaimed. Individuals seeking to claim unclaimed money can do so through the NSW Office of State Revenue. The legislation also includes provisions to protect the rights of owners, allowing them to reclaim the funds at any time. Failure to comply with reporting and remittance requirements can result in penalties, and the Office of State Revenue may audit and enforce compliance. The Unclaimed Money Act is subject to changes and updates over time, so staying informed about the specific requirements outlined in the Act is crucial.

3

NT

Unclaimed Money Act (NT) and Unclaimed Money Regulations (NT) The Northern Territory has its own legislation and regulations governing the handling of unclaimed money. Entities holding unclaimed money in the Northern Territory must report to the Northern Territory Government. While the details of this legislation were not specified in the original summaries, it is important to note that unclaimed money management is regulated within the Northern Territory.

4

QLD

Unclaimed Money Act 2008 (QLD) In Queensland, the Unclaimed Money Act 2008 defines the processes for dealing with unclaimed money. Unclaimed money encompasses funds held by businesses, government agencies, and financial institutions that have remained unclaimed by their rightful owners. The Act mandates that entities holding unclaimed money report and remit these funds to the Public Trustee of Queensland. Specific reporting requirements and deadlines are outlined within the legislation. Notification is a key aspect of the Act, as it requires businesses and financial institutions to make reasonable efforts to notify owners before reporting the unclaimed money. This notification process often includes written communication to ensure that owners have an opportunity to claim their funds. The legislation sets a defined period of dormancy, typically around 7 years, after which money is considered unclaimed. Individuals can search for and claim their unclaimed money through the Public Trustee of Queensland. The legislation also includes provisions to protect the rights of owners, allowing them to reclaim the funds at any time. Non-compliance with reporting and remittance requirements may result in penalties, and the Public Trustee may audit and enforce compliance. Like other jurisdictions, the Unclaimed Money Act in Queensland can change over time, necessitating businesses and entities to stay informed about the specific requirements outlined in the Act.

5

SA

Unclaimed Money Act 1992 (SA) In South Australia, unclaimed money is regulated by the Unclaimed Money Act 1992. The Act defines unclaimed money as funds held by businesses, government agencies, or financial institutions that have not been claimed or had any activity by the owner for a specified period. Reporting and remittance of unclaimed money to the Minister for Finance is required, and the legislation sets out the reporting process and deadlines. Entities holding unclaimed money must make reasonable efforts to notify owners before escheatment, as specified in the Act. Typically, this notification involves written communication. The legislation defines a dormancy period, which is typically around 7 years, after which money is considered unclaimed. Individuals can claim their unclaimed money through the Minister for Finance. The Act also includes provisions to safeguard the rights of owners, allowing them to reclaim the funds at any time. Non-compliance with reporting and remittance requirements may result in penalties, and the Minister for Finance may conduct audits and enforce compliance. The Unclaimed Money Act in South Australia can change over time, so it's essential for businesses and entities to stay informed about the specific requirements outlined in the Act.

6

TAS

Unclaimed Money Act 2019 (TAS) The Unclaimed Money Act 2019 in Tasmania governs the management of unclaimed money in the state. Unclaimed money, as defined by the Act, refers to funds held by businesses, government agencies, or financial institutions that have not been claimed or had any activity by the owner for a specified period. The Act sets out the process for reporting and remitting unclaimed money to the Department of Treasury and Finance, specifying reporting requirements and timelines. Notification is an essential aspect of the Act, as it requires entities holding unclaimed money to make reasonable efforts to notify owners before reporting it to the government. Typically, this notification process includes written communication to ensure that owners have an opportunity to claim their funds. The legislation defines the period of dormancy, typically around 7 years, after which money is considered unclaimed. Individuals can search for and claim their unclaimed money through the Department of Treasury and Finance. The legislation includes provisions to protect the rights of owners, allowing them to reclaim the funds at any time. Non-compliance with reporting and remittance requirements may result in penalties, and the Department of Treasury and Finance may audit and enforce compliance. The Unclaimed Money Act in Tasmania is subject to changes and updates over time, necessitating businesses and entities to stay informed about the specific requirements outlined in the Act.

7

VIC

Unclaimed Money Act 2008 (VIC) In Victoria, the Unclaimed Money Act 2008 governs the handling of unclaimed money. Unclaimed money is defined as money held by businesses, government agencies, or financial institutions that remains unclaimed by its rightful owner. The Act mandates the reporting and transfer of unclaimed funds to the State Revenue Office (SRO). Entities holding unclaimed money are required to adhere to specific reporting obligations, including deadlines for reporting and remittance. The Act emphasizes the importance of making reasonable efforts to notify owners before escheatment, commonly through written communication. The Act sets out a defined period of dormancy after which money is deemed unclaimed. This dormant period typically spans around 7 years. Individuals seeking to recover unclaimed money can do so through the State Revenue Office. The legislation includes provisions that safeguard the rights of owners, permitting them to reclaim their funds at any time. Failure to comply with reporting and remittance requirements may result in penalties, and the State Revenue Office has the authority to audit and enforce compliance. Like most unclaimed money legislation, the Unclaimed Money Act in Victoria can change over time, necessitating businesses and entities to stay informed about the specific requirements outlined in the Act.

8

WA

Unclaimed Money Act 1990 (WA) The Unclaimed Money Act 1990 in Western Australia governs the handling of unclaimed money in the state. Under this Act, unclaimed money is defined as funds held by businesses, government agencies, or financial institutions that have not been claimed or had any activity by the owner for a specified period. Entities holding unclaimed money are required to report and remit these funds to the Western Australian Treasury, adhering to the reporting criteria and schedules outlined in the Act. The legislation underscores the importance of making reasonable efforts to notify owners before escheatment, typically via written communication methods such as mail or email. Certainly, here's a more detailed summary of unclaimed money legislation for each state and territory in Australia, with each summary limited to approximately 500 words: New South Wales (NSW): The Unclaimed Money Act 1995 (NSW) governs the management and recovery of unclaimed money in New South Wales. Unclaimed money is defined as any money held by businesses, government agencies, or financial institutions that has been dormant or unclaimed by its rightful owner. The Act lays down specific guidelines for reporting and remitting unclaimed money to the NSW Office of State Revenue. Entities holding unclaimed money are obligated to report it to the Office, following established reporting deadlines. Before escheatment (the transfer of unclaimed money to the state), businesses and financial institutions are required to make reasonable efforts to notify owners. This notification often occurs via mail or email to ensure that owners have an opportunity to claim their funds. The Act defines the period of dormancy, typically around 7 years, after which money is considered unclaimed. Individuals seeking to claim unclaimed money can do so through the NSW Office of State Revenue. The legislation also includes provisions to protect the rights of owners, allowing them to reclaim the funds at any time. Failure to comply with reporting and remittance requirements can result in penalties, and the Office of State Revenue may audit and enforce compliance. The Unclaimed Money Act is subject to changes and updates over time, so staying informed about the specific requirements outlined in the Act is crucial. Victoria (VIC): In Victoria, the Unclaimed Money Act 2008 governs the handling of unclaimed money. Unclaimed money is defined as money held by businesses, government agencies, or financial institutions that remains unclaimed by its rightful owner. The Act mandates the reporting and transfer of unclaimed funds to the State Revenue Office (SRO). Entities holding unclaimed money are required to adhere to specific reporting obligations, including deadlines for reporting and remittance. The Act emphasizes the importance of making reasonable efforts to notify owners before escheatment, commonly through written communication. The Act sets out a defined period of dormancy after which money is deemed unclaimed. This dormant period typically spans around 7 years. Individuals seeking to recover unclaimed money can do so through the State Revenue Office. The legislation includes provisions that safeguard the rights of owners, permitting them to reclaim their funds at any time. Failure to comply with reporting and remittance requirements may result in penalties, and the State Revenue Office has the authority to audit and enforce compliance. Like most unclaimed money legislation, the Unclaimed Money Act in Victoria can change over time, necessitating businesses and entities to stay informed about the specific requirements outlined in the Act. Queensland (QLD): In Queensland, the Unclaimed Money Act 2008 defines the processes for dealing with unclaimed money. Unclaimed money encompasses funds held by businesses, government agencies, and financial institutions that have remained unclaimed by their rightful owners. The Act mandates that entities holding unclaimed money report and remit these funds to the Public Trustee of Queensland. Specific reporting requirements and deadlines are outlined within the legislation. Notification is a key aspect of the Act, as it requires businesses and financial institutions to make reasonable efforts to notify owners before reporting the unclaimed money. This notification process often includes written communication to ensure that owners have an opportunity to claim their funds. The legislation sets a defined period of dormancy, typically around 7 years, after which money is considered unclaimed. Individuals can search for and claim their unclaimed money through the Public Trustee of Queensland. The legislation also includes provisions to protect the rights of owners, allowing them to reclaim the funds at any time. Non-compliance with reporting and remittance requirements may result in penalties, and the Public Trustee may audit and enforce compliance. Like other jurisdictions, the Unclaimed Money Act in Queensland can change over time, necessitating businesses and entities to stay informed about the specific requirements outlined in the Act. Western Australia (WA): The Unclaimed Money Act 1990 in Western Australia governs the handling of unclaimed money in the state. Under this Act, unclaimed money is defined as funds held by businesses, government agencies, or financial institutions that have not been claimed or had any activity by the owner for a specified period. Entities holding unclaimed money are required to report and remit these funds to the Western Australian Treasury, adhering to the reporting criteria and schedules outlined in the Act. The legislation underscores the importance of making reasonable efforts to notify owners before escheatment, typically via written communication methods such as mail or email. The Act specifies a dormancy period, usually spanning around 7 years, after which money is considered unclaimed. Individuals seeking to claim their unclaimed money can do so through the Western Australian Treasury. The legislation incorporates provisions to protect the rights of owners, allowing them to reclaim the funds at any time. Failure to comply with reporting and remittance requirements can result in penalties, and the Western Australian Treasury may conduct audits and enforce compliance. Unclaimed money legislation in Western Australia can change over time, necessitating businesses and entities to stay informed about the specific requirements outlined in the Act.

9

Federal

Unclaimed Money Act 1990 (Cth) - This applies to unclaimed money held by federal agencies and entities. At the federal level, the Unclaimed Money Act 1990 (Cth) applies to unclaimed money held by federal agencies and entities. The Act defines reporting requirements and sets the federal government's role in managing unclaimed money. Entities holding unclaimed money at the federal level are required to report and remit it to the relevant federal authority, following the criteria and deadlines outlined in the Act. Similar to state legislation, entities must make reasonable efforts to notify owners before reporting the unclaimed money. The notification process often involves written communication. The Act specifies the period of dormancy, typically around 7 years, after which money is considered unclaimed. Individuals seeking to recover their unclaimed money can do so through the federal authority responsible for managing these funds. The legislation includes provisions to protect the rights of owners, allowing them to reclaim the funds at any time. Failure to comply with reporting and remittance requirements may result in penalties, and the federal authority may audit and enforce compliance. The Unclaimed Money Act at the federal level can change over time, so it's essential for businesses and entities to stay informed about the specific requirements outlined in the Act.

At Brown Refund Specialist, we take great care in following all legislation and regulations applicable to our clients. We understand that compliance is critical, and our team is extensively trained to stay up-to-date on the latest regulations, so you don't have to worry about it. Count on us to expertly navigate all legal requirements related to your business operations.

Legislation

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